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Oscar Wilde Quotes on Art (57 Quotes)


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  • All art is at once surface and symbol. Those who go beneath the surface do so at their peril.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • I should fancy that crime was to them what art is to us, simply a method of procuring extraordinary sensations.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • It often seems to me that art conceals the artist far more completely than it ever reveals him.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • To reveal art and conceal the artist is art's aim.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • You have killed my love. You used to stir my imagination. Now you don't even stir my curiosity. You simply produce no effect. I loved you because you were marvelous, because you had genius and intellect, because you realized the dreams of great poets and gave shape and substance to the shadows of art. You have thrown it all away. You are shallow and stupid
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")


  • Your rank and wealth, Harry; my brains, such as they are - my art, whatever it may be worth; Dorian Gray's good looks - we shall all suffer for what the gods have given us, suffer terribly.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • A subject that is beautiful in itself gives no suggestion to the artist. It lacks imperfection.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • All art is quite useless.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • His work was that curious mixture of bad painting and good intentions that always entitles a man to be called a representative British artist.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • For an artist to marry his model is as fatal as for a gourmet to marry his cook the one gets no sittings, and the other gets no dinners.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • Music is the art which is most nigh to tears and memory.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • The sign of a Philistine age is the cry of immorality against art.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • It is only an auctioneer who can equally and impartially admire all schools of art.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • The English public, as a mass, takes no interest in a work of art until it is told that the work in question is immoral.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • The moral life of man forms part of the subject-matter of the artist, but the morality of art consists of the perfect use of an imperfect medium.
    (Oscar Wilde)


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