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Oscar Wilde Quotes on Friendship (13 Quotes)


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  • It is quite true that I have worshipped you with far more romance of feeling than a man usually gives to a friend. Somehow, I had never loved a woman. I suppose I never had time. Perhaps, as Harry says, a really grande passion is the privilege of those who have nothing to do, and that is the use of the idle classes in a country
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Laughter is not at all a bad beginnig for a friendship, and it is by far the best ending for one.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • You have not realized how I have developed. I was a schoolboy when you knew me. I am a man now. I have new passions new thoughts new ideas. I am different but you must not like me less. I am changed but you must always be my friend.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Your mysterious young friend, whose name you have never told me, but whose picture really fascinates me, never thinks.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Anybody can sympathize with the sufferings of a friend, but it requires a very fine nature it requires, in fact, that nature of a true Individualist to sympathize with a friend's success.
    (Oscar Wilde)


  • An acquaintance that begins with a compliment is sure to develop into a real friendship.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • Between men and women there is no friendship possible. There is passion, enmity, worship, love, but no friendship.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • I seem to have heard that observation before. . . . It has all the vitality of error and all the tediousness of an old friend.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • Ultimately the bond of all companionship, whether in marriage or in friendship, is conversation.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • He has no enemies, but is intensely disliked by his friends.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • Laughter is not at all a bad beginning for a friendship, and it is far the best ending for one.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • But what is the good of friendship if one cannot say exactly what one means Anybody can say charming things and try to please and to flatter, but a true friend always says unpleasant things, and does not mind giving pain. Indeed, if he is a really true friend he prefers it, for he knows that then he is doing good.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • To have friends, you know, one need only be good-natured but when a man has no enemy left there must be something mean about him.
    (Oscar Wilde)


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