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Oscar Wilde Quotes on World (52 Quotes)


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  • There is a fatality about all physical and intellectual distinction, the sort of fatality that seems to dog through history the faltering steps of kings. It is better not to be different from one's fellows. The ugly and the stupid have the best of it in this world. They can sit at their ease and gape at the play. If they know nothing of victory, they are at least spared the knowledge of defeat. They live as we all should live, undisturbed, indifferent, and without disquiet.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • There was something in his face that made one trust him at once. All the candour of youth was there, as well as youth's passionate purity. One felt that he had kept himself unspotted from the world.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • What odd chaps you painters are! You do anything in the world to gain a reputation. As soon as you have one, you seem to want to throw it away. It is silly of you, for there is only one thing in the world worse than begin talked about, and that is not being talked about. A portrait like this would set you far above all the young men in England, and make the old men jealous, if old men are ever capable of any emotion.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • You, who know all the secrets of life, tell me how to charm Sibyl Vane to love me! I want to make Romeo jealous, I want the dead lovers of the world to hear our laughter, and grow sad. I want a breath of our passion to stir their dust into consciousness, to wake their ashes into pain.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry what the world thinks me: Dorian what I would like to be-in other ages, perhaps.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")


  • If I could get back my youth, I'd do anything in the world except get up early, take exercise or be respectable.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • In the common world of fact the wicked were not punished, nor the good rewarded. Success was given to the strong, failure thrust upon the weak. That was all.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • It is in the brain, and the brain only, that the great sins of the world take place also. You, Mr. Gray, you yourself, with yourrose-red youth and your rose-white boyhood, you have had passions that have made you afraid, thoughts that have filled you with terror, day-dreams and sleeping dreams whose mere memory might stain your cheek with shame…
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • She is all the great heroines of the world in one.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • She is all the great heroines of the world in one. She is more than an individual. I love her, and I must make her love me. I want to make Romeo jealous. I want the dead lovers of the world to hear our laughter, and grow sad. I want a breath of our passion to stir dust into consciousness, to wake their ashes into pain.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • The only horrible thing in the world is ennui.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • The world is changed because you are made of ivory and gold. The curves of your lips rewrite history.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • I am the only person in the world I should like to know thoroughly.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • What is termed Sin is an essential element of progress. Without it the world would stagnate, or grow old, or become colourless. By its curiosity Sin increases the experience of the race.
    (Oscar Wilde)

  • It is an odd thing, but every one who disappears is said to be in San Francisco. It must be a delightful city, and possess all the attractions of the next world.
    (Oscar Wilde)


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