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Oscar Wilde’s “The Picture of Dorian Gray” Quotes (161 Quotes)


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  • But beauty, real beauty, ends where all intellectual expression begins. Intellect is in itself a mode of exaggeration, and destroys the harmony of any face. The moment one sits down to think, one becomes al nose, or all forehead, or something horrid. Look at the successful men in any of the learned professions. How perfectly hideous they are! Except, of course, in the Church. But then in the Church they don't think.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • He watched it with that strange interest in trivial things that we try to develop when things of high import make us afraid, or when we are stirred by some new emotion for which we cannot find expression...
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • I have never searched for happiness. Who wants happiness? I have searched for pleasure.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • In the common world of fact the wicked were not punished, nor the good rewarded. Success was given to the strong, failure thrust upon the weak. That was all.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Look at the successful men in any of the learned professions. How perfectly hideous they are! Except, of course, in the Church. But then in the Church they don't think. A bishop keeps on saying at the age of eighty what he was told to say when he was a boy of eighteen, and as a natural consequence he always looks absolutely delightful.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")


  • She is very clever, too clever for a woman. She lacks the indefinable charm of weakness.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • The post on her left was occupied by Mr. Erskine of Treadley, an old gentleman of considerable charm and culture, who had fallen, however, into bad habits of silence, having, as he explained once to Lady Agatha, said everything that he had to say before he was thirty.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • There were sins whose fascination was more in the memory than in the doing of them, strange triumphs that gratified the pride more than the passions, and gave to the intellect a quickened sense of joy, greater than any joy they brought, or could ever bring, to the senses.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • What does it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his own soul?
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • You like every one; that is to say, you are indifferent to every one.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • But then one regrets the loss even of one's worst habits. Perhaps one regrets them the most. They are such an essential part of one's personality.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • He would never again tempt innocence. He would be good.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • I knew nothing but shadows and I thought them to be real.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • It is a sad thing to think of, but there is no doubt that Genius lasts longer than Beauty.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Love! What is love? It's nothing. It's just a word. It doesn't exist. Only pleasure is important.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")


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