Leo Tolstoy Quotes (295 Quotes)


    All that day she had had the feeling that she was playing in the theatre with actors better than herself and that her poor playing spoiled the whole thing.



    In spite of Stepan Arkadyevitch's efforts to be an attentive father and husband, he never could keep in his mind that he had a wife and children.




    When you understand that you will die to-morrow, if not to-day, and nothing will be left, then everything is so unimportant!... So one goes on living, amusing oneself with hunting, with work - anything so as not think of death

    But the princess had never seen the beautiful expression of her eyes; the expression that came into them when she was not thinking of herself. As is the case with everyone, her face assumed an affected, unnatural, ugly expression as soon as she looked in the looking glass.

    Here I am alive, and it's not my fault, so I have to try and get by as best I can without hurting anybody until death takes over.

    It's not given to people to judge what's right or wrong. People have eternally been mistaken and will be mistaken, and in nothing more than in what they consider right and wrong.

    Pierre had for the first time experienced that strange and fascinating feeling in the Slobodsky palace, when he suddenly felt that wealth and power and life, all that men build up and guard with such effort ,is only worth anything through the joy with which it can all be cast away.

    The subject of history is the life of peoples and of humanity. To catch and pin down in words--that is, to describe directly the life, not only of humanity, but even of a single people, appears to be impossible.

    Whatever question arose, a swarm of these drones, without having finished their buzzing on a previous theme, flew over to the new one and by their hum drowned and obscured the voices of those who were disputing honestly.

    All the girls in the world were divided into two classes: one class included all the girls in the world except her, and they had all the usual human feelings and were very ordinary girls; while the other class -herself alone- had no weaknesses and was superior to all humanity.


    He went down trying not to look long at her, as though she were the sun, but he saw her, as one sees the sun, without looking.

    In Varenka, she realized that one has but to forget oneself and love others, and one will be calm, happy, and noble.


    Then he thought himself unhappy, but happiness was all in the future; now he felt that the best happiness was already in the past.

    Without the support from religion--remember, we talked about it--no father, using only his own resources, would be able to bring up a child.

    Davout looked up and gazed intently at him. For some seconds they looked at one another, and that look saved Pierre. Apart from conditions of war and law, that look established human relations between the two men. At that moment an immense number of things passed dimly through both their minds, and they realized that they were both children of humanity and were brothers.




    The whole world is divided for me into two parts: one is she, and there is all happiness, hope, light; the other is where she is not, and there is dejection and darkness...

    When a man sees a dying animal, horror comes over him: that which he himself is, his essence, is obviously being annihilated before his eyes--is ceasing to be. But when the dying one is a person, and a beloved person, then, besides a sense of horror at the annihilation of life, there is a feeling of severance and a spiritual wound which, like a physical wound, sometimes kills and sometimes heals, but always hurts and fears any external, irritating touch.

    And not only the pride of intellect, but the stupidity of intellect. And, above all, the dishonesty, yes, the dishonesty of intellect. Yes, indeed, the dishonesty and trickery of intellect.


    I ... having filled my life with the spiritual blessings Christianity gave me, brimful of these blessings and living by them, I, like a child, not understanding them, destroy them -- that is, I wish to destroy that by which I live.


    She had no need to ask why he had come. She knew as certainly as if he had told her that he was here to be where she was.






    Pierre was right when he said that one must believe in the possibility of happiness in order to be happy, and I now believe in it. Let the dead bury the dead, but while I'm alive, I must live and be happy.


    When an apple has ripened and falls, why does it fall? Because of its attraction to the earth, because its stalk withers, because it is dried by the sun, because it grows heavier, because the wind shakes it, or because the boy standing below wants to eat it?

    And so liberalism had become a habit of Stepan Arkadyevitch's, and he liked his newspaper, as he did his cigar after dinner, for the slight fog it diffused in his brain.

    Every man, knowing to the smallest detail all the complexity of the conditions surrounding him, involuntarily assumes that the complexity of these conditions and the difficulty of comprehending them are only his personal, accidental peculiarity, and never thinks that others are surrounded by the same complexity as he is.

    I always loved you, and if one loves anyone, one loves the whole person, just as they are and not as one would like them to be. -Dolly


    She was in that highly-wrought state when the reasoning powers act with great rapidity: the state a man is in before a battle or a struggle, in danger, and at the decisive moments of life - those moments when a man shows once and for all what he is worth, that his past was not lived in vain but was a preparation for these moments.

    There are no conditions to which a person cannot grow accustomed, especially if he sees that everyone around him lives in the same way.


    Each man lives for himself, uses his freedom to achieve his personal goals, and feels with his whole being that right now he can or cannot do such-and-such an action; but as soon as he does it, this action, committed at a certain moment in time, becomes irreversible, and makes itself the property of history, in which is has not a free but a predestined significance.

    Human science fragments everything in order to understand it, kills everything in order to examine it.


    Power is the sum total of the wills of the mass, transfered by express or tactic agreement to rulers chosen by the masses.


    More Leo Tolstoy Quotations (Based on Topics)


    Life - Man - Love - World - Happiness - People - God - Mind - Truth - Christianity - Death & Dying - Time - Good & Evil - War & Peace - Reasoning - History - Beauty - Work & Career - Joy & Excitement - View All Leo Tolstoy Quotations

    More Leo Tolstoy Quotations (By Book Titles)


    - Anna Karenina
    - War and Peace

    Related Authors


    Ernest Hemingway - Charles Dickens - V. S. Naipaul - Pearl S. Buck - P. D. James - Naguib Mahfouz - Arthur Koestler - Anne Bronte - Alistair Maclean - Alexander Dumas


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