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Jack London Quotes (78 Quotes)


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  • He had killed man, the noblest game of all, and he had killed in the face of the law of club and fang.
    (Jack London, "The Call of the Wild")

  • He had come to know quite thoroughly the world in which he lived. His outlook was bleak and materialistic. The world as he saw it was a fierce and brutal world, a world without warmth, a world in which caresses and affection and the bright sweetness of spirit did not exist.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")

  • The aim of life was meat. Life itself was meat. Life lived on life. There were the eaters and the eaten. The law was: EAT OR BE EATEN. He did not formulate the law in clear, set terms and moralize about it. He did not even think the law; he merely lived the law without thinking about it at all.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")

  • He was a killer, a thing that preyed, living on the things that lived, unaided, alone, by virtue of his own strength and prowess, surviving triumphantly in a hostile environment where only the strong survive.
    (Jack London, "The Call of the Wild")

  • He had no conscious knowledge of death, but like every animal of the Wild, he possessed the instinct of death. To him it stood as the greatest of hurts. It was the very essence of the unknown; it was the sum of the terrors of the unknown, the one culminating and unthinkable catastrophe that could happen to him, about which he knew nothing and about which he feared everything.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")


  • The hand descended. Nearer and nearer it came. It touched the ends of his upstanding hair. He shrank down under it. It followed down after him, pressing more closely against him. Shrinking, almost shivering. He still managed to hold himself together. It was a torment, this hand that touched him and violated his instinct. He could not forget in a day all the evil that had been wrought him at the hands of men.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")

  • He was sounding the deeps of his nature, and of the parts of his nature that were deeper than he, going back into the womb of Time.
    (Jack London, "The Call of the Wild")

  • He was a silent fury who no torment could tame.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")

  • The pitch to which he was aroused was tremendous. All the fighting blood of his breed was up in him and surging through him. This was living., though he did not know it. He was realizing his own meaning in the world; he was doing that for which he was made.... He was justifying his existence, than which life can do no greater; for life achieves its summit when it does to the uttermost that which it was equipped to do.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")

  • His muscles had wasted away to knotty strings, and the flesh pads had disappeared, so that each rib and every bone in his frame were outlined cleanly through the loose hide that was wrinkled in folds of emptiness. It was heartbreaking, only Buck's heart was unbreakable. The man in the red sweater had proved that.
    (Jack London, "The Call of the Wild")

  • He was always striving to attain it. The life that was so swiftly expanding within him, urged him continually toward the wall of light. The life that was within him knew that it was the one way out, the way he was predestined to tread.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")

  • They were his environment, these men, and they were moulding the clay of him into a more ferocious thing than had been intended by Nature. Nevertheless, Nature had given him plasticity. Where many another animal would have died or had its spirit broken, he adjusted himself and lived, and at no expense of the spirit.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")

  • Love, genuine passionate love, was his for the first time.
    (Jack London, "The Call of the Wild")

  • His bondage had softened him. Irresponsibility had weakened him. He had forgotten how to shift for himself. The night yawned about him.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")

  • This expression of abandon and surrender, of absolute trust, he reserved for the master alone.
    (Jack London, "White Fang")


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