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John Dewey Quotes (53 Quotes)


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  • Anyone who has begun to think, places some portion of the world in jeopardy.
    (John Dewey)

  • Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of imagination.
    (John Dewey)

  • The only freedom that is of enduring importance is the freedom of intelligence, that is to say, freedom of observation and of judgment, exercised in behalf of purposes that are intrinsically worth while. The commonest mistake made about freedom is, I think, to identify it with freedom of movement, or, with the external or physical side of activity.
    (John Dewey)

  • What the best and wisest parent wants for his own child, that must the community want for all its children.
    (John Dewey)

  • Skepticism: the mark and even the pose of the educated mind.
    (John Dewey)


  • Education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.
    (John Dewey)

  • Man lives in a world of surmise, of mystery, of uncertainties.
    (John Dewey)

  • Just as a flower which seems beautiful and has color but no perfume, so are the fruitless words of the man who speaks them but does them not.
    (John Dewey)

  • By object is meant some element in the complex whole that is defined in abstraction from the whole of which it is a distinction.
    (John Dewey)

  • We eat out all the time, and you have no idea what you're eating.
    (John Dewey)

  • The belief that all genuine education comes about through experience does not mean that all experiences are genuinely or equally educative.
    (John Dewey)

  • I believe that the only true education comes through the stimulation of the child's powers by the demands of the social situations in which he finds himself.
    (John Dewey)

  • Every thinker puts some portion of an apparently stable world in peril.
    (John Dewey)

  • Failure is instructive. The person who really thinks learns quite as much from his failures as from his successes.
    (John Dewey)

  • One lives with so many bad deeds on one's conscience and some good intentions in one's heart.
    (John Dewey)


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