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Bertrand Russell Quotes (333 Quotes)


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  • War does not determine who is right - only who is left.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • A good notation has a subtlety and suggestiveness which at times make it almost seem like a live teacher.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • A proverb is one man's wit and all men's wisdom.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • With the introduction of agriculture mankind entered upon a long period of meanness, misery, and madness, from which they are only now being freed by the beneficent operation of the machine.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • There is no difference between someone who eats too little and sees Heaven and someone who drinks too much and sees snakes
    (Bertrand Russell)


  • I say quite deliberately that the Christian religion, as organized in its Churches, has been and still is the principal enemy of moral progress in the world.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth - more than ruin, more even than death.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • The good life, as I conceive it, is a happy life. I do not mean that if you are good you will be happy I mean that if you are happy you will be good.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • Some kind of philosophy is a necessity to all but the most thoughtless, and in the absence of knowledge it is almost sure to be a silly philosophy.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • I cannot be content with a brief moment of riotous living followed by destitution, and however clever the scientists may be, there are some things that they cannot be expected to achieve
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • Folly is perennial, yet the human race has survived.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • Mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true.
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • It is not by prayer and humility that you cause things to go as you wish, but by acquiring a knowledge of natural laws
    (Bertrand Russell)

  • In the first place a philosophical proposition must be general. It must not deal specially with things on the surface of the earth, or within the solar system, or with any other portion of space and time.... This brings us to a second characteristic of philosophical propositions, namely that they must be a priori. A philosophical proposition must be such as can neither be proved nor disproved by empirical evidence.... Philosophy, if what has been said is correct, becomes indistinguishable from logic as that word has now come to be used.
    (Bertrand Russell)


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