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John Locke Quotes (87 Quotes)


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  • Till a man can judge whether they be truths or not, his understanding is but little improved, and thus men of much reading, though greatly learned, but may be little knowing.
    (John Locke)

  • Things of this world are in so constant a flux, that nothing remains long in the same state.
    (John Locke)

  • The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it.
    (John Locke)

  • Man... hath by nature a power.... to preserve his property - that is, his life, liberty, and estate - against the injuries and attempts of other men.
    (John Locke)

  • If punishment makes not the will supple it hardens the offender.
    (John Locke)


  • I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts.
    (John Locke)

  • Freedom of men under government is to have a standing rule to live by, common to every one of that society, and made by the legislative power vested in it a liberty to follow my own will in all things, when the rule prescribes not, and not to be subject to the inconstant, unknown, arbitrary will of another man.
    (John Locke)

  • It is easier for a tutor to command than to teach.
    (John Locke)

  • I find every sect, as far as reason will help them, make use of it gladly and where it fails them, they cry out, It is a matter of faith, and above reason
    (John Locke)

  • One unerring mark of the love of truth is not entertaining any proposition with greater assurance than the proofs it is built upon will warrant.
    (John Locke)

  • What worries you, masters you.
    (John Locke)

  • New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without anyother reason but because they are not already common.
    (John Locke)

  • All men are liable to error; and most men are, in many points, by passion or interest, under temptation to it.
    (John Locke)

  • The discipline of desire is the background of character.
    (John Locke)

  • Religion, which should most distinguish us from beasts, and ought most peculiarly to elevate us, as rational creatures, above brutes, is that wherein men often appear most irrational, and more senseless than beasts themselves.
    (John Locke)


    More John Locke Quotations (Based on Topics)


    Man - Wisdom & Knowledge - Reasoning - Mind - World - Truth - Liberty & Freedom - People - Vice & Virtue - Society & Civilization - Education - Error & Mistake - Property - Belief & Faith - Time - Experience - Reading - Thought & Thinking - Law & Regulation - Power - View All John Locke Quotations

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