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Jean-Paul Sartre Quotes (125 Quotes)


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  • The rain has stopped, the air is mild, the sky slowly rolls up fine black images : it is more than enough to frame the perfect moment ; to reflect these images, she would cause dark little tides to be born in our hearts. I don't know how to take advantage of the occasion : I walk at random, calm and empty, under this wasted sky.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • The sun is not ridiculous, quite the contrary. On everything I like, on the rust of the construction girders, on the rotten boards of the fence, a miserly, uncertain light falls, like the look you give, after a sleepless night, on decisions made with enthusiasm the day before, on pages you have written in one spurt without crossing out a word.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • The true sea is cold and black, full of animals...
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • The vegetation has crawled mile for mile towards the towns. It is waiting. When the town dies, the Vegetation will invade it, it will clamber over the stones, it will grip them, search them, burst them open with its long black pincers; it will bind the holes and hang its green paws everywhere.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • Through the lack of attaching myself to words, my thoughts remain nebulous most of the time. They sketch vague, pleasant shapes and then are swallowed up; I forget them almost immediately.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")


  • When she was in Djibouti and I was in Aden, and I used to go and see her for twenty-four hours, she managed to multiply the misunderstandings between us until there were exactly sixty minutes before I had to leave; sixty minutes, just long enough to make you feel the seconds passing one by one.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • You must be like me; you must suffer in rhythm.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • I am beginning to believe that nothing can ever be proved. These are honest hypotheses which take the facts into account: but I sense so definitely that they come from me, and that they are simply a way of unifying my own knowledge. Not a glimmer comes from Rollebon's side. Slow, lazy, sulky, the facts adapt themselves to the rigour of the order I wish to give them; but it remains outside of them. I have the feeling of doing a work of pure imagination.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • Nothing happens while you live. The scenery changes, people come in and go out, that's all. There are no beginnings. Days are tacked on to days without rhyme or reason, an interminable, monotonous addition.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • I am going to outlive myself. Eat, sleep, sleep, eat. Exist slowly, softly, like these trees, like a puddle of water, like the red bench in the streetcar.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • Objects should not touch because they are not alive. You use them, put them back in place, you live among them: they are useful, nothing more. But they touch me, it is unbearable. I am afraid of being in contact with them as though they were living beasts.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • I am. I am, I exist, I think, therefore I am; I am because I think, why do I think? I don't want to think any more, I am because I think that I don't want to be, I think that I . . . because . . . ugh!
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • People who live in society have learnt how to see themselves, in mirrors, as they appear to their friends. I have no friends: is that why my flesh is so naked?
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • I exist. It's sweet, so sweet, so slow. And light: you'd think it floated all by itself. It stirs. It brushes by me, melts and vanishes. Gently, gently. There is bubbling water in my throat, it caresses me- and now it comes up again into my mouth. For ever I shall have a little pool of whitish water in my mouth - lying low - grazing my tongue. And this pool is still me. And the tongue. And the throat is me.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")

  • She suffers as a miser. She must be miserly with her pleasures, as well. I wonder if sometimes she doesn't wish she were free of this monotonous sorrow, of these mutterings which start as soon as she stops singing, if she doesn't wish to suffer once and for all, to drown herself in despair. In any case, it would be impossible for her: she is bound.
    (Jean-Paul Sartre, "Nausea")


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    Man - Life - God - People - World - Time - Mind - Happiness - Truth - Charity - Death & Dying - War & Peace - Literature - Sadness - Thought & Thinking - Place - Facts - Books - Reasoning - Defeats - View All Jean-Paul Sartre Quotations

    More Jean-Paul Sartre Quotations (By Book Titles)


    - Nausea

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