George Washington Quotes (182 Quotes)


    Experience teaches us that it is much easier to prevent an enemy from posting themselves than it is to dislodge them after they have got possession.

    As Mankind becomes more liberal, they will be more apt to allow that all those who conduct themselves as worthy members of thecommunity are equally entitled to the protections of civil government. I hope ever to see America among the foremost nations of justice and liberality.

    An army of asses led by a lion is better than an army of lions led by an ass.

    Experience has taught us that men will not adopt and carry into execution measures the best calculated for their own good without the intervention of a coercive power.

    It is well, I die hard, but I am not afraid to go. Dec. 14, 1977


    The consciousness of having attempted faithfully to discharge my duty, and the approbation of my Country will be a sufficient recompense for my Services

    No man is a warmer advocate for proper restraints and wholesome checks in every department of government than I am but I have never yet been able to discover the propriety of placing it absolutely out of the power of men to render essential services.

    The consideration that human happiness and moral duty are inseparably connected will always continue to prompt me to promote the former by inculcating the practice of the latter.

    In executing the duties of my present important station, I can promise nothing but purity of intentions, and, in carrying these into effect, fidelity and diligence

    It may be laid down as a primary position, and the basis of our system, that every Citizen who enjoys the protection of a Free Government, owes not only a proportion of his property, but even of his personal services to the defense of it.

    What we're trying to do is use some of the same legal tactics that have been so effective against the public health problem of smoking against the other public health problem of obesity,

    Let your heart feel for the afflictions and distress of everyone, and let your hand give in proportion to your purse.

    Mankind, when left to themselves, are unfit for their own government.

    My brave fellows, ... you have done all I asked you to do and more than could be reasonably expected. But this country is at stake, your wives, your homes and everything you hold dear. You have borne yourself up with fatigues and hardships, but we know not how to spare you. If you consent to stay one month longer, you will render that service to the cause of liberty and this country which you probably could never do under any other circumstances.

    When a people shall have become incapable of governing themselves, and fit for a master, it is of little consequence from what quarter he comes

    We ought to deprecate the hazard attending ardent and susceptible minds, from being too strongly, and too early prepossessed in favor of other political systems, before they are capable of appreciating their own.

    In general I esteem it a good maxim, that the best way to preserve the confidence of the people durably is to promote their true interest

    I am led to reflect how much more delightful to an undebauched mind, is the task of making improvements on the earth, than all the vain glory which can be acquired from ravaging it, by the most uninterrupted career of conquests.

    Let your Discourse with Men of Business be Short and Comprehensive.

    Avoiding likewise the accumulation of debt, not only by shunning occasions of expense, but by vigorous exertions in time of peace to discharge the debts which unavoidable wars have occasioned, not ungenerously throwing upon posterity the burthen whic

    President Washington's second oath of office was taken in the Senate Chamber of Congress Hall in Philadelphia on March 4, the date fixed by the Continental Congress for inaugurations. Before an assembly of Congressmen, Cabinet officers, judges of the fede.

    To be prepared for war is one of the most effective means of preserving peace.

    (Liberty) is indeed little less than a name, where the Government is too feeble to withstand the enterprises of faction, to confine each member of society within the limits prescribed by the law, and to maintain all in the secure and tranquil enjoyme

    I cannot conceive a rank more honorable, than that which flows from the uncorrupted choice of a brave and free people, the purest source and original fountain of all power

    I have no other view than to promote the public good, and am unambitious of honors not founded in the approbation of my Country.

    Even the country's first president chafed at the limits placed on him by the writers of the U.S. Constitution. From the nature of the Constitution, ... I must approve all the parts of a bill, or reject it in toto.

    The bosom of America is open to receive not only the Opulent and respectable Stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all Nations And Religions whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges, if by decency and proprie

    There is nothing so likely to produce peace as to be well prepared to meet the enemy.

    In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.

    Among individuals, the most certain way to make a Man your Enemy, is to tell him you esteem him such so with public bodies


    Related Authors


    Theodore Roosevelt - Ronald Reagan - Franklin D. Roosevelt - Lyndon B. Johnson - John Quincy Adams - Jimmy Carter - James A. Garfield - Herbert Hoover - Harry S. Truman - Andrew Jackson


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