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Viktor E. Frankl Quotes on Life (22 Quotes)


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  • The way in which a man accepts his fate and all the suffering it entails, the way in which he takes up his cross, gives him ample opportunity - even under the most difficult circumstances - to add a deeper meaning to his life. It may remain brave, dignified and unselfish. Or in the bitter fight for self preservation he may forget his human dignity and become no more than an animal
    (Viktor E. Frankl, "Man's Search for Meaning")

  • Ultimate meaning necessarily exceeds and surpasses the finite intellectual capacities of man... What is demanded of man is not, as some existential philosophers teach, to endure the meaninglessness of life, but rather to bear his incapacity to grasp its unconditional meaningfulness in rational terms. Logos is deeper than logic.
    (Viktor E. Frankl, "Man's Search for Meaning")

  • What is demanded of man is not, as some existential philosophers teach, to endure the meaninglessness of life, but rather to bear his incapacity to grasp its unconditional meaninglessness in rational terms.
    (Viktor E. Frankl, "Man's Search for Meaning")

  • Woe to him who saw no more sense in his life, no aim, no purpose, and therefore no point in carrying on.
    (Viktor E. Frankl, "Man's Search for Meaning")

  • A man's concern, even his despair, over the worthwhileness of life is an existential distress but by no means a mental disease.
    (Viktor E. Frankl, "Man's Search for Meaning")


  • An active life serves the purpose of giving man the opportunity to realize values in creative work, while a passive life of enjoyment affords him the opportunity to obtain fulfillment in experiencing beauty, art, or nature.
    (Viktor E. Frankl, "Man's Search for Meaning")

  • If there is meaning in life at all, then there must be a meaning in suffering. Suffering is an ineradicable part of life, even as fate and death. Without suffering and death human life cannot be complete.
    (Viktor E. Frankl, "Man's Search for Meaning")

  • Long ago we had passed the stage of asking what was the meaning of life, a naïve query which understands life as the attaining of some aim through the active creation of something of value.
    (Viktor E. Frankl, "Man's Search for Meaning")

  • Challenging the meaning of life is the truest expression of the state of being human.
    (Viktor E. Frankl)

  • For the first time in my life, I was able to understand the words, 'The angels are lost in perpetual contemplation of an infinite glory.'
    (Viktor E. Frankl)

  • It did not really matter what we expected from life, but rather what life expected from us. We needed to stop asking about the meaning of life, and instead to think of ourselves as those who were being questioned by life daily and hourly. Our answer must consist, not in talk and meditation, but in right action and in right conduct. Life ultimately means taking the responsibility to find the right answer to its problems and to fulfill the tasks which it constantly sets for each individual.
    (Viktor E. Frankl)

  • A man who becomes conscious of the responsibility he bears toward a human being who affectionately waits for him, or to an unfinished work, will never be able to throw away his life. He knows the 'why' for his existence, and will be able to bear almost any 'how.'
    (Viktor E. Frankl)

  • Each man is questioned by life; and he can only answer to life by answering for his own life; to life he can only respond by being responsible.
    (Viktor E. Frankl)

  • Our main motivation for living is our will to find meaning in life.
    (Viktor E. Frankl)

  • For the meaning of life differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour. What matters, therefore, is not the meaning of life in general but rather the specific meaning of a person's life at a given moment.
    (Viktor E. Frankl)


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