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Thomas Hardy’s “Far from the Madding Crowd” Quotes (26 Quotes)


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  • She simply observed herself as a fair product of Nature in the feminine kind, her thoughts seeming to glide into far-off though likely dramas in which men would play a part-vistas of probable triumphs-the smiles being of a phase suggesting that hearts were imagined as lost and won.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • A man's body is as the shell, or the tablet, of his soul, as he is reserved or ingenuous, overflowing or self-contained.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • Sometimes I shrink from your knowing what I have felt for you, and sometimes I am distressed that all of it you will never know.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • Bathsheba loved Troy in the way that only self-reliant women love when they abandon their self-reliance. When a strong woman recklessly throws away her strength she is worse than a weak woman who has never any strength to throw away. One source of her inadequacy is the novelty of the occasion. She has never had practice in making the best of such a condition. Weakness is doubly weak by being new.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • Stupors, however, do not last forever
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")


  • George's son had done his work so thoroughly that he was considered too good a workman to live, and was, in fact, taken and tragically shot at twelve o'clock that same day-another instance of the untoward fate which so often attends dogs and other philosophers who follow out a train of reasoning to its logical conclusion, and attempt perfectly consistent conduct in a world made up so largely of compromise.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • The most vigorous expression of a resolution does not always coincide with the greatest vigour of the resolution itself. It is often flung out as a sort of prop to support a decaying conviction which, whilst strong, required no enunciation to prove it so.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • He wished she knew his impressions, but he would as soon as thought of carrying an odour in a net as of attempting to convey the intangibles of his feeling in the coarse meshes of language. So he remained silent.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • The vast difference between starting a train of events, and directing into a particular groove a series already started, is rarely apparent to the person confounded by the issue.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • I have felt lately, more and more, that my present way of living is bad in every respect.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • They spoke very little of their mutual feelings: pretty phrases and warm attentions being probably unnecessary between such tried friends.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")


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