Home >> Quotes & Sayings >>

Thomas Hardy Quotes on Man (13 Quotes)


Find Thomas Hardy on Man books & products @ Amazon


  • Indifference to fate which, though it often makes a villain of a man, is the basis of his sublimity when it does not.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • Men thin away to insignificance and oblivion quite as often by not making the most of good spirits when they have them as by lacking good spirits when they are indispensable.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • Or, to state his character as it stood in the scale of public opinion, when his friends and critics were in tantrums, he was considered rather a bad man; when they were pleased, he was rather a good man; when they were neither, he was a man whose moral colour was a kind of pepper-and-salt mixture.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • She simply observed herself as a fair product of Nature in the feminine kind, her thoughts seeming to glide into far-off though likely dramas in which men would play a part-vistas of probable triumphs-the smiles being of a phase suggesting that hearts were imagined as lost and won.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Far from the Madding Crowd")

  • Remember that the best and greatest among mankind are those who do themselves no worldly good. Every successful man is more or less a selfish man. The devoted fail...
    (Thomas Hardy, "Jude the Obscure")


  • The yard was a little centre of regeneration. Here, with keen edges and smooth curves, were forms in the exact likeness of those he had seen abraded and time-eaten on the walls. These were the ideas in modern prose which the lichened colleges presented in old poetry. Even some of those antiques might have been called prose when they were new. They had done nothing but wait, and had become poetical. How easy to the smallest building; how impossible to most men.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Jude the Obscure")

  • Why it was that upon this beautiful feminine tissue, sensitive as gossamer, and practically blank as snow as yet, there should have been traced such a coarse pattern as it was doomed to receive; why so often the coarse appropriates the finer thus, the wrong man the woman, the wrong women the man, many years of analytical philosophy have failed to explain to our sense of order
    (Thomas Hardy, "Tess of the D'Urbervilles")

  • But, unto the store
    Of human deeds divine in all but name,
    Was it not worth a little hour or more
    To add yet this: Once you, a woman, came
    To soothe a time-torn man; even though it be
    You love me not.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Tess of the D'Urbervilles")

  • You was a good man, and did good things.
    (Thomas Hardy)

  • Her life was the price she would pay for that whine--
    For a child by the man she did not love.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Tess of the D'Urbervilles")

  • The value of old age depends upon the person who reaches it. To some men of early performance it is useless. To others, who are late to develop, it just enables them to finish the job.
    (Thomas Hardy)

  • One pondered on the life of man,
    His hopes, his endings, and began
    To rate the Market's sordid war
    As something scarce worth living for.
    (Thomas Hardy, "Tess of the D'Urbervilles")

  • The main object of religion is not to get a man into heaven, but to get heaven into him.
    (Thomas Hardy)


    Related Authors