Robert E. Lee Quotes (45 Quotes)


    My chief concern is to try to be an humble, earnest Christian.

    Obedience to lawful authority is the foundation of manly character.


    It appears we have appointed our worst generals to command forces, and our most gifted and brilliant to edit newspapers

    Whiskey - I like it, I always did, and that is the reason I never use it.


    We failed, but in the good providence of God apparent failure often proves a blessing.

    It is well that war is so terrible. We should grow too fond of it.

    A true man of honor feels humbled himself when he cannot help humbling others.

    It is good that war is so horrible, or we might grow to like it.


    You must be careful how you walk, and where you go, for there are those following you who will set their feet where yours are set.

    It would appear that General Hooker has placed his hindquarters where his headquarters should be. (So said by Lee when he learned that General Hooker, the new Union Commander, had written, in a letter to his soldiers, that My headquarters will be 'in the saddle.'

    The war... was an unnecessary condition of affairs, and might have been avoided if forebearance and wisdom had been practiced on both sides.

    Duty, then is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all things. You cannot do more; you should never wish to do less.

    The trite saying that honesty is the best policy has met with the just criticism that honesty is not policy. The real honest man is honest from conviction of what is right, not from policy.

    Our country demands all our strength, all our energies. To resist the powerful combination now forming against us will require every man at his place. If victorious, we have everything to hope for in the future. If defeated, nothing will be left for us to live for. My whole trust is in God, and I am ready for whatever He may ordain.

    After four years of arduous service marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Norther Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the brave survivors of some many hard fought battles who have remained steadfast to the last that I have consented to this result from no distrust of them. But feeling that valor and devotion could accomplish nothing that could compensate for the loss that must have attended the continuance of the contest, I determined to avoid the useless sacrifice of those whose past services have endeared them to their countrymen. By the terms of the agreement, officers and men can return to their homes and remain until exchanged. You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from a consciousness of duty faithfully performed and I earnestly pray that a Merciful God will extend to you His blessings and protection. With an unceasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your Country, and a grateful remembrance of your kind and generous consideration for myself, I bid you all an affectionate farewell. R. E. Lee Genl.(Robert E. Lee's farewell address, April 9th, 1865)

    Private and public life are subject to the same rules-- truth and manliness are two qualities that will carry you through this world much better then policy or tact or expediency or other words that were devised to conceal a deviation from a straight line.

    Get correct views of life, and learn to see the world in its true light. It will enable you to live pleasantly, to do good, and, when summoned away, to leave without regret.

    The truth is this The march of Providence is so slow and our desires so impatient the work of progress is so immense and our means of aiding it so feeble the life of humanity is so long, that of the individual so brief, that we often see only the ebb of the advancing wave and are thus discouraged. It is history that teaches us to hope.

    We have but one rule here, and that is that every student must be a gentleman.

    I have fought against the people of the North because I believed they were seeking to wrest from the South its dearest rights. But I have never cherished toward them bitter or vindictive feelings, and have never seen the day when I did not pray for them.

    The education of a man is never completed until he dies.

    There is a terrible war coming, and these young men who have never seen war cannot wait for it to happen, but I tell you, I wish that I owned every slave in the South, for I would free them all to avoid this war.

    I like whiskey. I always did, and that is why I never drink it.


    What a cruel thing war is... to fill our hearts with hatred instead of love for our neighbors.

    Lee tells his troops. After four years of arduous service marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources.

    I think it better to do right, even if we suffer in so doing, than to incur the reproach of our consciences and posterity.

    The education of a man is never complete until he dies.


    We have fought this fight as long, and as well as we know how. We have been defeated. For us as a Christian people, there is now but one course to pursue. We must accept the situation.

    I tremble for my country when I hear of confidence expressed in me. I know too well my weakness, that our only hope is in God.

    I cannot trust a man to control others who cannot control himself.

    Never do a wrong thing to make a friend or to keep one.

    Duty is the sublimest word in the language. You can never do more than your duty. You should never wish to do less.


    He loves his sailors, he loves his Navy, no bones about that, ... He never expects anything in return. That's what I love about him.


    What a cruel thing is war to separate and destroy families and friends, and mar the purest joys and happiness God has granted us in this world to fill our hearts with hatred instead of love for our neighbors, and to devastate the fair face of this beautiful world.

    My experience through life has convinced me that, while moderation and temperance in all things are commendable and beneficial, abstinence from spirituous liquors is the best safeguard of morals and health.

    In all my perplexities and distresses, the Bible has never failed to give me light and strength.

    It is well that war is so terrible, or we should grow too fond of it.

    We must expect reverses, even defeats. They are sent to teach us wisdom and prudence, to call forth greater energies, and to prevent our falling into greater disasters.

    I have been up to see the Congress and they do not seem to be able to do anything except to eat peanuts and chew tobacco, while my army is starving.


    More Robert E. Lee Quotations (Based on Topics)


    War & Peace - Man - Duty - Language - God - Life - World - Resource - Friendship - Failure - Hope - Christianity - People - Love - Confidence - Honesty & Integrity - Place - Blessings - Obedience - View All Robert E. Lee Quotations

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