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Plato Quotes on Man (49 Quotes)


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  • If women are expected to do the same work as men, we must teach them the same things.
    (Plato, "The Republic")

  • The man who finds that in the course of his life he has done a lot of wrong often wakes up at night in terror, like a child with a nightmare, and his life is full of foreboding: but the man who is conscious of no wrongdoing is filled with cheerfulness and with the comfort of old age.
    (Plato, "The Republic")

  • There is a constant suspicion that headache and giddiness are to be ascribed to philosophy, and hence all practising or making trial of virtue in the higher sense is absolutely stopped; for a man is always fancying that he is being made ill, and is in constant anxiety about the state of his body.
    (Plato, "The Republic")

  • Then not only an old man, but also a drunkard, becomes a second time a child.
    (Plato)

  • Any man may easily do harm, but not every man can do good to another.
    (Plato)


  • If a man be endowed with a generous mind, this is the best kind of nobility.
    (Plato)

  • More will be accomplished, and better, and with more ease, if every man does what he is best fitted to do, And nothing else.
    (Plato)

  • For neither birth, nor wealth, nor honors, can awaken in the minds of men the principles which should guide those who from their youth aspire to an honorable and excellent life, as Love awakens them
    (Plato)

  • Well, my art of midwifery is in most respects like theirs but differs, in that I attend men and not women, and I look after their souls when they are in labor, and not after their bodies and the triumph of my art is in thoroughly examining whether the thought which the mind of the young man brings forth is a false idol or a noble and true birth.
    (Plato)

  • States are as the men, they grow out of human characters.
    (Plato)

  • The noblest of all studies is the study of what man is and of what life he should live.
    (Plato)

  • We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.
    (Plato)

  • Few men are so obstinate in their atheism, that a pressing danger will not compel them to the acknowledgement of a divine power.
    (Plato)

  • Death is not the worst that can happen to men.
    (Plato)

  • The greatest penalty of evildoing namely, to grow into the likeness of bad men.
    (Plato)


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