Home >> Quotes & Sayings >>

Oscar Wilde Quotes (991 Quotes)


Find Oscar Wilde books & products @ Amazon


  • What fire does not destroy, it hardens
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • You must have a cigarette. A cigarette is the perfect type of a perfect pleasure. It is exquisite, and it leaves one unsatisfied. What more can you want?
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Algernon: What you really are is a Bunburyist. I was quite right in saying you were a Bunburyist. You are one of the most advanced Bunburyists I know.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Importance of Being Earnest")

  • It is very vulgar to talk about one's business.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Importance of Being Earnest")

  • You have always told me it was Ernest. I have introduced you to every one as Ernest. You answer to the name of Ernest. You look as if your name was Ernest. You are the most earnest-looking person I ever saw in my life. It is perfectly absurd your saying that your name isn't Ernest.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Importance of Being Earnest")


  • But Venice, like Oxford, had kept the background for romance, and, to the true romantic, background was everything, or almost everything.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Her trust makes me faithful, her belief makes me good.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • I like Wagner's music better than anybody's. It is so loud that one can talk the whole time without other people hearing what one says.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • It is in the brain, and the brain only, that the great sins of the world take place also. You, Mr. Gray, you yourself, with yourrose-red youth and your rose-white boyhood, you have had passions that have made you afraid, thoughts that have filled you with terror, day-dreams and sleeping dreams whose mere memory might stain your cheek with shame…
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Man is many things, but he is not rational.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • She was a curious woman, whose dresses always looked as if they had been designed in a rage and put on in a tempest. She was usually in love with somebody, and, as her passion was never returned, she had kept all her illusions. She tried to look picturesque, but only succeeded in being untidy.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • The rich would have spoken on the value of thrift and the idle grown eloquent over the dignity of labour.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • Thin-lipped wisdom spoke at her from the worn chair, hinted at prudence, quoted from that book of cowardice whose author apes the name of common sense.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • What odd chaps you painters are! You do anything in the world to gain a reputation. As soon as you have one, you seem to want to throw it away. It is silly of you, for there is only one thing in the world worse than begin talked about, and that is not being talked about. A portrait like this would set you far above all the young men in England, and make the old men jealous, if old men are ever capable of any emotion.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")

  • You, who know all the secrets of life, tell me how to charm Sibyl Vane to love me! I want to make Romeo jealous, I want the dead lovers of the world to hear our laughter, and grow sad. I want a breath of our passion to stir their dust into consciousness, to wake their ashes into pain.
    (Oscar Wilde, "The Picture of Dorian Gray")


    Related Authors




Pg 5/671...34567...102030...Last