Miguel de Cervantes Quotes (121 Quotes)


    And for the citation of so many authors, 'tis the easiest thing in nature. Find out one of these books with an alphabetical index, and without any farther ceremony, remove it verbatim into your own... there are fools enough to be thus drawn into an opinion of the work at least, such a flourishing train of attendants will give your book a fashionable air, and recommend it for sale.


    It seldom happens that any felicity comes so pure as not to be tempered and allayed by some mixture of sorrow.


    Too much sanity may be madness and the maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be.


    That's the nature of women, not to love when we love them, and to love when we love them not.

    Delay always breeds danger; and to protract a great design is often to ruin it.



    Pray look better, Sir... those things yonder are no giants, but windmills.



    I do not say a proverb is amiss when aptly and reasonably applied, but to be forever discharging them, right or wrong, hit or miss, renders conversation insipid and vulgar.




    For historians ought to be precise, truthful, and quite unprejudiced, and neither interest nor fear, hatred nor affection, should cause them to swerve from the path of truth, whose mother is history, the rival of time, the depository of great actions, the witness of what is past, the example and instruction of the present, the monitor of the future.


    One who has not only the four S's, which are required in every good lover, but even the whole alphabet as for example... Agreeable, Bountiful, Constant, Dutiful, Easy, Faithful, Gallant, Honorable, Ingenious, Kind, Loyal, Mild, Noble, Officious, Prudent, Quiet, Rich, Secret, True, Valiant, Wise the X indeed, is too harsh a letter to agree with him, but he is Young and Zealous.


    Be a terror to the butchers, that they may be fair in their weight; and keep hucksters and fraudulent dealers in awe, for the same reason.


    I believe there's no proverb but what is true; they are all so many sentences and maxims drawn from experience, the universal mother of sciences.

    There is a strange charm in the thoughts of a good legacy, or the hopes of an estate, which wondrously removes or at least alleviates the sorrow that men would otherwise feel for the death of friends.

    There is also this benefit in brag, that the speaker is unconsciously expressing his own ideal. Humor him by all means, draw it all out, and hold him to it.

    Though God's attributes are equal, yet his mercy is more attractive and pleasing in our eyes than his justice.






    Related Authors


    V. S. Naipaul - Umberto Eco - Salman Rushdie - Pearl S. Buck - P. D. James - Louisa May Alcott - Katherine Dunn - Honore de Balzac - Elizabeth Gilbert - Boris Pasternak


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