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Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” Quotes (77 Quotes)


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  • I feel exquisite pleasure in dwelling on the recollections of childhood, before misfortune had tainted my mind, and changed its bright visions of extensive usefulness into gloomy and narrow reflections upon self.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • It was the secrets of heaven and earth that I desired to learn; and whether it was the outward substance of things or the inner spirit of nature and the mysterious soul of man that occupied me, still my inquiries were directed to the metaphysical, or in its highest sense, the physical secrets of the world.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • The different accidents of life are not so changeable as the feelings of human nature.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Who shall conceive the horrors of my secret toil as I dabbled among the unhallowed damps of the grave or tortured the living animal to animate the lifeless clay?
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • I felt emotions of gentleness and pleasure, that had long appeared dead, revive within me. Half surprised by the novelty of these sensations, I allowed myself to be borne away by them, and forgetting my solitude and deformity, dared to be happy. Soft tears again bedewed my cheeks, and I even raised my humid eyes with thankfulness towards the blessed sun, which bestowed such joy upon me.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")


  • It was very different when the masters of science sought immortality and power; such views, although futile, were grand: but now the scene was changed. The ambition of the inquirer seemed to limit itself to the annihilation of those visions on which my interest in science was chiefly founded. I was required to exchange chimeras of boundless grandeur for realities of little worth.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Even where the affections are not strongly moved by any superior excellence, the companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain. They know our infantine dispositions, which, however they may be afterwards modified, are never eradicated; and they can judge of our actions with more certain conclusions as to the integrity of our motives.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • A mind of moderate capacity which closely pursues one study must infallibly arrive at great proficiency in that study.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • A miserable spectacle of wrecked humanity, pitiable to others and intolerable to myself.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust?
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • But he found that a traveller's life is one that includes much pain amidst its enjoyments. His feelings are for ever on the stretch; and when he begins to sink into repose, he finds himself obliged to quit that on which he rests in pleasure for something new, which again engages his attention, and which also he forsakes for other novelties.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • But soon, I shall die, and what I now feel be no longer felt. Soon these burning miseries will be extinct.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Continue for the present to write to me by every opportunity: I may receive your letters on some occasions when I need them most to support my spirits.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Devil, do you dare approach me? and do you not fear the fierce vengeance of my arm wreaked on your miserable head?
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")


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