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Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” Quotes (77 Quotes)


  • I also became a poet, and for one year lived in a Paradise of my own creation; I imagined that I also might obtain a niche in the temple where the names of Homer and Shakespeare are consecrated.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Polluted by crimes, and torn by the bitterest remorse, where can I find rest but in death?
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • I was new to sorrow, but it did not the less alarm me.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • The world was to me a secret which I desired to devine.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge, and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be his world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")


  • Yet from whom has not that rude hand rent away some dear connexion; and why should I describe a sorrow which all have felt, and must feel? The time at length arrives, when grief is rather an indulgence than a necessity; and the smile that plays upon the lips, although it may be deemed a sacrilege, is not banished.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • A mind of moderate capacity which closely pursues one study must infallibly arrive at great proficiency in that study.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • A miserable spectacle of wrecked humanity, pitiable to others and intolerable to myself.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust?
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • But he found that a traveller's life is one that includes much pain amidst its enjoyments. His feelings are for ever on the stretch; and when he begins to sink into repose, he finds himself obliged to quit that on which he rests in pleasure for something new, which again engages his attention, and which also he forsakes for other novelties.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • But soon, I shall die, and what I now feel be no longer felt. Soon these burning miseries will be extinct.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Continue for the present to write to me by every opportunity: I may receive your letters on some occasions when I need them most to support my spirits.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Devil, do you dare approach me? and do you not fear the fierce vengeance of my arm wreaked on your miserable head?
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Do I not deserve an acomplish of some great purpose? ... I prefer glory to every enticement than wealth placed in my path.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")