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Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” Quotes (77 Quotes)


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  • Had I right, for my own benefit, to inflict this curse upon everlasting generations? I had before been moved by the sophisms of the being I had created; I had been struck senseless by his fiendish threats; but now, for the first time, the wickedness of my promise burst upon me; I shuddered to think that future ages might curse me as their pest, whose selfishness had not hesitated to buy its own peace at the price, perhaps, of the existence of the whole human race.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • I trembled, and my heart failed within me; when, on looking up, I saw, by the light of the moon, the daemon at the casement.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • My reign is not yet over... you live, and my power is complete. Follow me; I seek the everlasting ices of the north, where you will feel the misery of cold and frost to which I am impassive. You will find near this place, if you follow not too tardily, a dead hare; eat and be refreshed. Come on, my enemy; we have yet to wrestle for our lives; but many hard and miserable hours must you endure until that period shall arrive.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • The whole series of my life appeared to me as a dream; I sometimes doubted if indeed it were all true, for it never presented itself to my mind with the force of reality.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • He is dead who called me into being, and when I shall be no more the very remembrance of us both will speedily vanish.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")


  • I was benevolent and good; misery made me a fiend. Make me happy, and I shall again be virtuous.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • My spirit will sleep in peace; or if it thinks, it will not surely think thus. Farewell.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • The world to me was a secret, which I desired to discover; to her it was a vacancy, which she sought to people with imaginations of her own.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • He seems to feel his own worth, and the greatness of his fall.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • I was new to sorrow, but it did not the less alarm me.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Nothing contributes so much to tranquillize the mind as a steady purpose- a point on which the soul can focus its intellectual eye
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • The world was to me a secret which I desired to devine.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Heavy misfortunes have befallen us, but let us only cling closer to what remains, and transfer our love for those whom we have lost to those who yet live. Our circle will be small, but bound close by the ties of affection and mutual misfortune. And when time shall have softened your despair, new and dear objects of care will be born to replace those of whom we have been so cruelly deprived.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • I was seized by remorse and the sense of guilt, which hurried me away to a hell of intense tortures as no language can describe
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")


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