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Margaret Atwood’s “The Blind Assassin” Quotes (55 Quotes)


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  • Blondes are like white mice, you only find them in cages. They wouldn't last long in nature. They're too conspicuous.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • Paper isn't important. It's the words on them that are important.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • They were new money, without a doubt: so new it shrieked. Their clothes looked as it they'd covered themselves in glue, then rolled around in hundred-dollar bills.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • Wild geese fly south, creaking like anguished hinges; along the riverbank the candles of the sumacs burn dull red. It's the first week of October. Season of woolen garments taken out of mothballs; of nocturnal mists and dew and slippery front steps, and late-blooming slugs; of snapdragons having one last fling; of those frilly ornamental pink-and-purple cabbages that never used to exist, but are all over everywhere now.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • But in the end, back she comes. There's no use resisting. She goes to him for amnesia, for oblivion. She renders herself up, is blotted out; enters the darkness of her own body, forgets her name. Immolation is what she wants, however briefly. To exist without boundaries.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")


  • Perhaps they were looking for passion; perhaps they delved into this book as into a mysterious parcel - a gift box at the bottom of which, hidden in layers of rustling tissue paper, lay something they'd always longed for but couldn't ever grasp.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • Things might have been different if she hadn't been able to drift; if she'd had to concentrate on her next meal, instead of dwelling on all the injuries she felt we'd done her. An unearned income encourages self-pity in those already prone to it.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • Women have curious ways of hurting someone else. They hurt themselves instead; or else they do it so the guy doesn't even know he's been hurt until much later. Then he finds out. Then his dick falls off.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • But thoughtless ingratitude is the armour of the young; without it, how would they ever get through life? The old wish the young well, but they wish them ill also: they would like to eat them up, and absorb their vitality, and remain immortal themselves. Without the protection of surliness and levity, all children would be crushed by the past - the past of others, loaded on their shoulders. Selfishness is their saving grace.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • She had her reasons. Not that they were the same as anybody else's reasons.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • Things written down can cause a great deal of harm. All too often, people don't consider that.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • Yes, it does feel deceptively safer with two; but Thou is a slippery character. Every Thou I've known has had a way of going missing. They skip town or turn perfidious, or else the drop like flies and then where are you?
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • Don't blame me, blame history, he says, smiling. Such things happen. Falling in love has been recorded, or at least those words have.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • She who pays the undertaker calls the tune.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")

  • This is how the girl who couldn't speak and the man who couldn't see fell in love.
    (Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin")


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