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Jung Chang Quotes (25 Quotes)


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  • Father is close, Mother is close, but neither is as close as Chairman Mao.
    (Jung Chang, "Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China")

  • If you have love, even plain cold water is sweet.
    (Jung Chang, "Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China")

  • The Japanese are a disease of the skin...the Communists are a disease of the heart. Everything personal was political... Two reds sandwiching a black...
    (Jung Chang, "Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China")

  • When a man gets power, even his chickens and dogs rise to heaven.
    (Jung Chang, "Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China")

  • It's taken us 10 years, and it was constant excitement. I was constantly shocked by how evil he could be. Mao was very, very shrewd but he didn't have human feeling.
    (Jung Chang)


  • Although my book is banned I am still allowed to go to China and travel. There is no longer the kind of control that Mao used to have-there have been deep fundamental changes in society.
    (Jung Chang)

  • China is more prosperous than before. The people have better lives but they are not happy and confident because the scars are still there.
    (Jung Chang)

  • While I was writing Wild Swans I thought the famine was the result of economic mismanagement but during the research I realised that it was something more sinister.
    (Jung Chang)

  • I like to have Chinese furniture in my home as a constant and painful reminder of how much has been destroyed in China. The contrast between the beauty of the past and the ugliness of the modern is nowhere sharper than in China.
    (Jung Chang)

  • What has marked Chinese society is its level of cruelty, not just revolutions and wars. We ought to reject it totally, otherwise in another upheaval there will be further cruelty.
    (Jung Chang)

  • I always wanted to be a writer.
    (Jung Chang)

  • I feel perhaps my heart is still in China.
    (Jung Chang)

  • I would love mainland Chinese to read my book. There is a Chinese translation which I worked on myself, published in Hong Kong and Taiwan. Many copies have gone into China but it is still banned.
    (Jung Chang)

  • Doing this book didn't shock me at a personal level. I was no longer haunted by the past and I can honestly say that revenge is not in my nature.
    (Jung Chang)

  • I no longer have the terrible nightmares that I used to have. Mao had just died in 1976, and China began to open up. For the first time scholarships to go to the West to study were awarded on academic merit.
    (Jung Chang)


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