Jane Austen Quotes (569 Quotes)


    Every body else had something to say; every body was either surprised or not surprised, and had some question to ask, or some comfort to offer.

    It is not every man's fate to marry the woman who loves him best

    She did not really like her. She would not be in a hurry to find fault, but she suspected that there was no elegance, ease, but not elegance... Her person was rather good; her face not unpretty; but neither feature nor air, nor voice, nor manner were elegant.

    Where shall we see a better daughter, or a kinder sister, or a truer friend?

    Every body at all addicted to letter writing, without having much to say, which will include a large proportion of the female world at leastà



    Sitting with her on Sunday evening - a wet Sunday evening - the very time of all others when if a friend is at hand the heart must be opened, and every thing toldà

    And from the whole she deduced this useful lesson, that to go previously engaged to a ball, does not necessarily increase either the dignity or enjoyment of a young lady.

    Life, if you live it right, keeps surprising you, and the thing that keeps surprising you the most…is yourself


    Every body has their taste in noises as well as other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity.

    It does not come to me in quite so direct a line as that; it takes a bend or two, but nothing of consequence. The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away.

    Thus much indeed he was obliged to acknowledge - that he had been constant unconsciously, nay unintentionally; that he had meant to forget her, and believed it to be done. He had imagined himself indifferent, when he had only been angry; and he had been unjust to her merits, because he had been a sufferer from them.

    Affectation of candour is common enough-one meets with it everywhere. But to be candid without ostentation or design-to take the good of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad-belongs to you alone.

    Did not you? I did for you. But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never.



    If you were to give me forty such men, I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness. No, no, let me shift for myself; and, perhaps, if I have very good luck, I may meet with another Mr. Collins in time.

    Miss Bennet was therefore established as a sweet girl, and their brother felt authorized by such a commendation to think of her as he chose.


    There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of all human characters, and of the little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or sense.





    Every thing was to take its natural course, however, neither impelled nor assisted.

    It is only by seeing women in their own homes, among their own set, just as they always are, that you can form any just judgment. Short of that, it is all guess and luck-and will generally be ill-luck. How many a man has committed himself on a short acquaintance, and rued it all the rest of his life!

    She regained the street--happy in this, that though much had been forced on her against her will, though she had in fact heard the whole substance of Jane Fairfax's letter, she had been able to escape the letter itself.

    Where the waters do agree, it is quite wonderful the relief they give.


    It was a gloomy prospect, and all that she could do was to throw a mist over it, and hope when the mist cleared away, she should see something else.


    And now I may dismiss my heroine to the sleepless couch, which is the true heroine's portion - to a pillow strewed with thorns and wet with tears. And lucky may she think herself, if she get another good night's rest in the course of the next three months.

    No young lady can be justified in falling in love before the gentleman's love is declared. It must be very improper that a young lady should dream of a gentleman before the gentleman is first known to have dreamt of her.

    Well, then, I must say that I do not like him at all. Though it has turned out so well for us, I do not like him at all. As it happens, there is no great harm done, because I do not think Isabella has any heart to lose. But, suppose he had made her very much in love with him?

    Good company requires only birth, manners and education and, with regard to education, I'm afraid it is not very particular

    It would be difficult to say which had seen highest perfection in the other, or which had been the happiest: she, in receiving his declarations and proposals, or he in having them accepted.





    I encourage him to be in his garden as often as possible. Then he has to walk to Rosings nearly every day. ... I admit I encourage him in that also.


    Miss Bingley's congratulations to her brother, on his approaching marriage, were all that was affectionate and insincere.

    Oh! if that is all, I have a very poor opinion of young men who live in Derbyshire; and their intimate friends who live in Hertfordshire are not much better. I am sick of them all. Thank Heaven! I am going tommorow where I shall find a man who has not one agreeable quality, who has neither manner nor sense to recommend him. Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing, after all.

    There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.



    I am excessively fond of a cottage; there is always so much comfort, so much elegance about them. And I protest, if I had any money to spare, I should buy a little land and build one myself, within a short distance of London, where I might drive myself down at any time, and collect a few friends about me and be happy. I advise everybody who is going to build, to build a cottage.



    More Jane Austen Quotations (Based on Topics)


    Man - World - Woman - Love - Happiness - Pleasure - Mind - Sense & Perception - Life - Friendship - Wisdom & Knowledge - Opinions - Emotions - Time - Sadness - Anger - Fate & Destiny - Manner - Education - View All Jane Austen Quotations

    More Jane Austen Quotations (By Book Titles)


    - Emma
    - Mansfield Park
    - Northanger Abbey
    - Persuasion
    - Pride and Prejudice
    - Sense and Sensibility

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