Jane Austen Quotes (569 Quotes)


    But a note had had been prepared and left for her, written in the very style to touch --a small mixture of reproach with a great deal of kindness

    I don't approve of surprises. The pleasure is never enhanced and the inconvenience is considerable.

    Nobody, who has not been in the interior of a family, can say what the difficulties of any individual of that family may be.

    Trusting that you will some time or other do me greater justice than you can do now.



    If I am missed it will appear. I may be discovered by those who want to see me. I shall not be in any doubtful, or distant, or unapproachable region.

    Shall I ask you how the church is to be filled, if a man is neither to take orders with a living, nor without?

    You will think me rhapsodising; but when I am out of doors, especially when I am sitting out of doors, I am very apt to get into this sort of wandering strain. One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy.

    I leave it to be settled, by whomsoever it may concern, whether the tendency of this work be altogether to recommend parental tyranny, or reward filial disobedience.


    Anne could not immediately fall into a quotation again. The sweet scenes of autumn were for a while put by - unless some tender sonnet, fraught with the apt analogy of the declining year, with declining happiness, and the images of youth and hope, and spring, all gone together, blessed her memory.

    I never saw quite so wretched an example of what a sea-faring life can do: but to a degree, I know it is the same with them all; they are all knocked about, and exposed to every climate, and every weather, till they are not fit to be seen. It is a pity they are not knocked on the head at once, before they reach Admiral Baldwin's age.

    The evening ended with dancing. On its being proposed, Anne offered her services, as usual, and though her eyes would sometimes fill with tears as she sat at the instrument, she was extremely glad to be employed, and desired nothing in return but to be unobserved.



    Had Elizabeth been able to encounter his eye, she might have seen how well the expression of heartfelt delight, diffused over his face, became him; but, though she could not look, she could listen, and he told her of feelings, which, in proving of what importance she was to him, made his affection every moment more valuable.

    I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.




    The loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable - that one false step involves in her endless ruin - that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful - and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behavior towards the undeserving of the opposite sex.


    You are over-scrupulous, surely. I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very glad to see you; and I will send a few lines by you to assure him of my hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chooses of the girls; though I must throw in a good word for my little Lizzy.

    Esteem him! Like him! Cold-hearted Elinor! Oh! worse than cold-hearted! Ashamed of being otherwise. Use those words again, and I will leave the room this moment.


    Dear Diary, Today I tried not to think about Mr. Knightly. I tried not to think about him when I discussed the menu with Cook... I tried not to think about him in the garden where I thrice plucked the petals off a daisy to acertain his feelings for Harriet. I don't think we should keep daisies in the garden, they really are a drab little flower. And I tried not to think about him when I went to bed, but something had to be done.




    But you must give my compliments to him. Yes - I think it must be compliments. Is not there a something wanted, Miss Price, in our language - a something between compliments and - and love - to suit the sort of friendly acquaintance we have had together? - So many months acquaintance! - But compliments may be sufficient here.


    More Jane Austen Quotations (Based on Topics)


    Man - World - Woman - Love - Happiness - Pleasure - Mind - Sense & Perception - Life - Friendship - Wisdom & Knowledge - Time - Sadness - Emotions - Opinions - Education - Anger - Manner - Fate & Destiny - View All Jane Austen Quotations

    More Jane Austen Quotations (By Book Titles)


    - Emma
    - Mansfield Park
    - Northanger Abbey
    - Persuasion
    - Pride and Prejudice
    - Sense and Sensibility

    Related Authors


    Voltaire - Niccolo Machiavelli - Margaret J. Wheatley - Karen Armstrong - Joseph Addison - John Grisham - Herbert Kaufman - Henry Lawson - Edward Fairfax - Ayn Rand


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