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Jane Austen’s “Northanger Abbey” Quotes (42 Quotes)


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  • His departure gave Catherine the first experimental conviction that a loss may be sometimes a gain.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • The advantages of natural folly in a beautiful girl have been already set forth by the capital pen of a sister author; and to her treatment of the subject I will only add, in justice to men, that though to the larger and more trifling part of the sex, imbecility in females is a great enhancement of their personal charms, there is a portion of them too reasonable and too well informed themselves to desire anything more in woman than ignorance.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • I am fond of history and am very well contented to take the false with the true. In the principal facts they have sources of intelligence in former histories and records, which may be as much depended on, I conclude, as anything that does not actually pass under ones own observation; and as for the little embellishments you speak of, they are embellishments, and I like them as such.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • The anxiety, which in this state of their attachment must be the portion of Henry and Catherine, and of all who loved either, as to its final event, can hardly extend, I fear, to the bosom of my readers, who will see in the tell-tale compression of the pages before them, that we are all hastening together to perfect felicity.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • I assure you. I have no notion of treating men with such respect. That is the way to spoil them.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")


  • The mere habit of learning to love is the thing; and a teachableness of disposition in a young lady is a great blessing
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • I leave it to be settled, by whomsoever it may concern, whether the tendency of this work be altogether to recommend parental tyranny, or reward filial disobedience.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • The most charming young man in the world is instantly before the imagination of us all.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • A family of ten children will be always called a fine family, where there are heads and arms and legs enough for the number.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • If I could not be persuaded into doing what I thought wrong, I will never be tricked into it.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • The past, present, and future, were all equally in gloom.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • A mother would have been always present. A mother would have been a constant friend; her influence would have been beyond all other.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • If the heroine of one novel be not patronized by the heroine of another, from whom can she expect protection and regard?
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")

  • A young woman in love always looks like Patience on a monument Smiling at Grief.
    (Jane Austen, "Northanger Abbey")


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