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Jane Austen’s “Mansfield Park” Quotes (52 Quotes)


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  • Her mind was all disorder. The past, present, future, every thing was terrible.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Mrs. Norris hitched a breath and went on again.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Those who have not more must be satisfied with what they have.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • I am very strong. Nothing ever fatigues me, but doing what I do not like.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Nobody meant to be unkind, but nobody put themselves out of their way to secure her comfort.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")


  • Varnish and gilding hide many stains.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • I fancy Miss Price has been more used to deserve praise than to hear ità
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • None but a woman can teach the science of herself.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • We do not look in great cities for our best morality.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • A fondness for reading, properly directed, must be an education in itself.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • I have no talent for certainty.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Oh! write, write. Finish it at once. Let there be an end of this suspense. Fix, commit, condemn yourself.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Without any display of doing more than the rest, or any fear of doing too much, he was always true to her interests and considerate of her feelings, trying to make her good qualities understood, and to conquer the diffidence which prevented them from being more apparent; giving her advice, consolation, and encouragement.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Believe me, I have no please in the world superior to that of contributing to yours. No, I can safely say, I have no pleasure so complete, so unalloyed. It is without a drawback.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • I purposefully abstain from dates on this occasion,that very one may be liberty to fix their own,aware that the cure of unconquerable passions,and the transfer of unchanging attachments,must vary much as to time in different people.---I only entreat every body to believe that exactly at the time when it was quite natural that it should be so, and not a week earlier,Edmund did cease to care about Miss Crawford, and become anxious to marry Fanny,as Fanny herself could desire.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")


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