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Jane Austen’s “Mansfield Park” Quotes (52 Quotes)


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  • He feared that principle, active principle, had been wanting; that they had never been properly taught to govern their inclinations and tempers by that sense of duty which can alone suffice. They had been instructed theoretically in their religion, but never required to bring it into daily practice.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. I quit such odious subjects as soon as I can, impatient to restore everybody not greatly in fault themselves to tolerable comfort, and to have done with all the rest.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • There is no reason in the world why you should not be important where you are known. You have good sense, and a sweet temper, and I am sure you have a grateful heart, that could never receive kindness without hoping to return it. I do not know any better qualifications for a friend and companion.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • He had suffered, and he had learnt to think, two advantages that he had never known beforeà
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Let us have the luxury of silence.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")


  • These were reflections that required some time to soften; but time will do almost every thingà
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • He was in love, very much in love; and it was a love which, operating on an active, sanguine spirit, of more warmth than delicacy, made her affection appear of greater consequence, because it was witheld, and determined him to have the glory, as well as the felicity of forcing her to love him.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Mr. Rushworh was very ready to request the favour of Mr. Crawford's assistance; and Mr. Crawford after properly depreciating his own abilities, was quite at his service in any way that could be useful.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • This was a letter to be run through eagerly, to be read deliberately, to supply matter for much reflection, and to leave everything in greater suspense than ever.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Her mind was all disorder. The past, present, future, every thing was terrible.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Mrs. Norris hitched a breath and went on again.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Those who have not more must be satisfied with what they have.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • I am very strong. Nothing ever fatigues me, but doing what I do not like.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Nobody meant to be unkind, but nobody put themselves out of their way to secure her comfort.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")

  • Varnish and gilding hide many stains.
    (Jane Austen, "Mansfield Park")


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