Jane Austen Quotes on Woman (26 Quotes)




    If you are not so compassionate as to dine to-day with Louisa and me, we shall be in danger of hating each other for the rest of our lives, for a whole day's tête-à-tête between two women can never end without a quarrel.

    Without thinking highly either of men or of matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only honourable provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.

    You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them.



    A young woman, if she fall into bad gands, may be teazed, and kept at a distance from those she wants to be with; but one cannot comprehend a young man's being under such restraint, as not to be able to spend a week with his father, if he likes it.

    It is not every man's fate to marry the woman who loves him best

    No, indeed, I shall grant you nothing. I always take the part of my own sex. I do indeed. I give you notice-- You will find me a formidable antagonist on that point. I always stand up for women.



    A man does not recover from such devotion of the heart to such a woman! He ought not; he does not.

    But I hate to hear you talking so like a fine gentleman, and as if women were all fine ladies, instead of rational creatures. We none of us expect to be in smooth water all our days.

    I do regard her as one who is too modest for the world in general to be aware of half her accomplishments, and too highly accomplished for modesty to be natural of any other woman.

    There, he had seen every thing to exalt in his estimation the woman he had lost, and there begun to deplore the pride, the folly, the madness of resentment, which had kept him from trying to regain her when thrown in his way.

    A man who has been refused! How could I ever be foolish enough to expect a renewal of his love? Is there one among the sex, who would not protest against such a weakness as a second proposal to the same woman? There is no indignity so abhorrent to their feelings!

    It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage.

    Woman is fine for her own satisfaction alone. No man will admire her the more, no woman will like her the better for it. Neatness and fashion are enough for the former, and a something of shabbiness or impropriety will be most endearing to the latter.

    Good-humoured, unaffected girls, will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women. They are two distinct orders of being.

    She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper.

    But history, real solemn history, I cannot be interested in.... I read it a little as a duty, but it tells me nothing that does not either vex or weary me. The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars or pestilences, in every page the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all it is very tiresome.

    Real solemn history, I cannot be interested in . . . The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars or pestilences in every page the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all.

    A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.

    It sometimes happens that a woman is handsomer at twenty-nine than she was ten years before.

    No man is offended by another man's admiration of the woman he loves; it is the woman only who can make it a torment.

    An engaged woman is always more agreeable than a disengaged. She is satisfied with herself. Her cares are over, and she feels that she may exert all her powers of pleasing without suspicion. All is safe with a lady engaged; no harm can be done.


    More Jane Austen Quotations (Based on Topics)


    Man - World - Woman - Love - Pleasure - Happiness - Mind - Life - Sense & Perception - Friendship - Wisdom & Knowledge - Time - Sadness - Opinions - Emotions - Manner - Fate & Destiny - Education - Anger - View All Jane Austen Quotations

    More Jane Austen Quotations (By Book Titles)


    - Emma
    - Mansfield Park
    - Northanger Abbey
    - Persuasion
    - Pride and Prejudice
    - Sense and Sensibility

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