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Haruki Murakami’s “The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle” Quotes (59 Quotes)


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  • Hatred is like a long, dark shadow. Not even the person it falls upon knows where it comes from, in most cases. It is like a two-edged sword. When you cut the other person, you cut yourself. The more violently you hack at the other person, the more violently you hack at yourself. It can often be fatal. But it is not easy to dispose of. Please be careful, Mr.Okada. It is very dangerous. Once it has taken root in your heart, hatred is the most difficult think in the world to shake off.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • It was not one of those strong, impulsive feelings that can hit two people like an electric shock when they first meet, but something quieter and gentler, like two tiny lights traveling in tandem through a vast darkness and drawing imperceptibly closer to each other as they go.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • Thanks to the long days of rain, the blades of grass glowed with a deep-green luster, and they gave off the smell of wildness unique to things that sink their roots into the earth.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • Have you ever had that feeling-that you'd like to go to a whole different place and become a whole different self?
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • Kumiko and I felt something for each other from the beginning. It was not one of those strong, impulsive feelings that can hit two people like an electric shock when they first meet, but something quieter and gentler, like two tiny lights traveling in tandem through a vast darkness and drawing imperceptibly closer to each other as they go. As our meetings grew more frequent, I felt not so much that I had met someone new as that I had chanced upon a dear old friend.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")


  • The darkness behind my closed eyelids was like the cloud-covered sky, but the gray was somewhat deeper. Every few minutes, someone would come and paint over the gray with a different-textured gray - one with a touch of gold or green or red. I was impressed with the variety of grays that existed. Human beings were so strange. All you had to do was sit still for ten minutes, and you could see this amazing variety of grays.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • His heart, like mine, was ticking off the time allotted to his small restless body.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • Living like an empty shell is not really living, no matter how many years it may go on. The heart and flesh of an empty shell give birth to nothing more than the life of an empty shell.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • The heavy smell of flower petals stroked the walls of my lungs.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • Holding this soft, small living creature in my lap this way, though, and seeing how it slept with complete trust in me, I felt a warm rush in my chest. I put my hand on the cat's chest and felt his heart beating. The pulse was faint and fast, but his heart, like mine, was ticking off the time allotted to his small body with all the restless earnestness of my own.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • Maybe she thought the garbage and rocks in your head were interesting. But finally, garbage is garbage and rocks are rocks.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • The little things are important, Mr. Wind-Up Bird,
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • I don't know -- maybe the world has two different kinds of people, and for one kind the world is this completely logical, rice pudding place, and for the other it's all hit-or-miss macaroni gratin.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • Maybe the world was like a revolving door, it occurred to him as his consciousness was fading away. And which section you ended up in was just a matter of where your foot happened to fall...And there was no logical continuity from one section to another. And it was because of this lack of logical continuity that choices really didn't mean very much.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")

  • The point is, not to resist the flow. You go up when you're supposed to go up and down when you're supposed to go down. When you're supposed to go up, find the highest tower and climb to the top. When you're supposed to go down, find the deepest well and go down to the bottom. When there's no flow, stay still. If you resist the flow, everything dries up. If everything dries up, the world is darkness.
    (Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle")


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