Home >> Quotes & Sayings >>

Charles Dickens Quotes (757 Quotes)


Find Charles Dickens books & products @ Amazon


  • A multitude of people and yet solitude.
    (Charles Dickens, "A Tale of Two Cities")

  • I see a beautiful city and a brilliant people rising from this abyss, and, in their struggles to be truly free, in their triumphs and defeats, through long years to come, I see the evil of this time and of the previous time of which this is the natural birth, gradually making expiation for itself and wearing out...
    (Charles Dickens, "A Tale of Two Cities")

  • The great grindstone, Earth, had turned when Mr. Lorry looked out again, and the sun was red on the courtyard. But, the lesser grindstone stood alone there in the calm morning air, with red upon it that the sun had never give, and would never take away.
    (Charles Dickens, "A Tale of Two Cities")

  • He didn't at all see why the busy bee should be proposed as a model to him; he supposed the Bee liked to make honey, or he wouldn't do it - nobody asked him. It was not necessary for the bee to make such a merit of his tastes.
    (Charles Dickens, "Bleak House")

  • I have often remarked- I suppose everybody has- that one's going away from a familiar place, would seem to be the signal for a change in it.
    (Charles Dickens, "David Copperfield")


  • This was my only and my constant comfort. When I think of it, the picture always rises in my mind, of a summer evening, the boys at play in the churchyard, and I sitting on my bed, reading as if for life.
    (Charles Dickens, "David Copperfield")

  • I am what you designed me to be.I am your blade. You cannot now complain if you also feel the hurt
    (Charles Dickens, "Great Expectations")

  • One should never be ashamed to cry. Tears are rain on the dust of earth.
    (Charles Dickens, "Great Expectations")

  • How slight a thing will disturb the equanimity of our frail minds!
    (Charles Dickens, "Oliver Twist")

  • On the eve of long voyages or an absence of many years, friends who are tenderly attached will seperate with the usual look, the usual pressure of the hand, planning one final interview for the morrow, while each well knows that it is but a poor feint to save the pain of uttering that one word, and the meeting will never be. Should possibilities be worse to bear than certainties?
    (Charles Dickens, "The Old Curiosity Shop")

  • All through it, I have known myself to be quite undeserving. And yet I have had the weakness, and have still the weakness, to wish you to know with what a sudden mastery you kindled me, heap of ashes that I am, into fire- a fire, however, inseparable in its nature from myself, quickening nothing, lighting nothing, doing no service, idly burning away.
    (Charles Dickens, "A Tale of Two Cities")

  • In seasons of pestilence, some of us will have a secret attraction to the disease--a terrible passing inclination to die of it.
    (Charles Dickens, "A Tale of Two Cities")

  • The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance.
    (Charles Dickens, "A Tale of Two Cities")

  • I found every breath of air, and every scent, and every flower and leaf and blade of grass and every passing cloud, and everything in nature, more beautiful and wonderful to me than I had ever found it yet. This was my first gain from my illness. How little I had lost, when the wide world was so full of delight for me.
    (Charles Dickens, "Bleak House")

  • I know enough of the world now to have almost lost the capacity of being much surprised by anything
    (Charles Dickens, "David Copperfield")


    Related Authors




Pg 1/5112345...102030...Last