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Aristotle Quotes on Nature (19 Quotes)


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  • Great men are always of a nature originally melancholy.
    (Aristotle)

  • The state is a creation of nature and man is by nature a political animal.
    (Aristotle)

  • The moral virtues, then, are produced in us neither by nature nor against nature. Nature, indeed, prepares in us the ground for their reception, but their complete formation is the product of habit.
    (Aristotle)

  • All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.
    (Aristotle)

  • The beginning of reform is not so much to equalize property as to train the noble sort of natures not to desire more, and to prevent the lower from getting more.
    (Aristotle)


  • Art not only imitates nature, but also completes it deficiencies.
    (Aristotle)

  • Hence poetry is something more philosophic and of graver import than history, since its statements are rather of the nature of universals, whereas those of history are singulars.
    (Aristotle)

  • Poetry is something more philosophic and of graver import than history, since its statements are of nature of universals, whereas those of history are of singulars
    (Aristotle)

  • Nature does nothing in vain.
    (Aristotle)

  • Nature does nothing uselessly.
    (Aristotle)

  • He who can be, and therefore is, another's, and he who participates in reason enough to apprehend, but not to have, is a slave by nature.
    (Aristotle)

  • If purpose, then, is inherent in art, so is it in Nature also. The best illustration is the case of a man being his own physician, for Nature is like that agent and patient at once.
    (Aristotle)

  • It is the mark of an instructed mind to rest satisfied with the degree of precision which the nature of the subject admits and not to seek exactness when only an approximation of the truth is possible.
    (Aristotle)

  • It is the mark of an educated mind to rest satisfied with the degree of precision which the nature of the subject admits and not to seek exactness where only an approximation is possible.
    (Aristotle)

  • In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.
    (Aristotle)


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