Albert Einstein Quotes on Wisdom & Knowledge (22 Quotes)




    The opinion prevailed among advanced minds that it was time that belief should be replaced increasingly by knowledge belief that did not itself rest on knowledge was superstition, and as such had to be opposed.

    We have penetrated far less deeply into the regularities obtaining within the realm of living things, but deeply enough nevertheless to sense at least the rule of fixed necessity... what is still lacking here is a grasp of the connections of profound generality, but not a knowledge of order itself.

    Peace cannot be kept by force; it can only be achieved by understanding.


    Wisdom is not a product of schooling but of the lifelong attempt to acquire it.

    Understanding of our fellow human beings...becomes fruitful only when it is sustained by sympathetic feelings in joy and sorrow.

    The further the spiritual evolution of mankind advances, the more certain it seems to me that the path to genuine religiosity does not lie through the fear of life, and the fear of death, and blind faith, but through striving after rational knowledge.

    The finest emotion of which we are capable is the mystic emotion. Herein lies the germ of all art and all true science. Anyone to whom this feeling is alien, who is no longer capable of wonderment and lives in a state of fear is a dead man. To know that what is impenatrable for us really exists and manifests itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, whose gross forms alone are intelligible to our poor faculties - this knowledge, this feeling ... that is the core of the true religious sentiment. In this sense, and in this sense alone, I rank myself amoung profoundly religious men.

    It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge.

    A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.

    The gift of fantasy has meant more to me than my talent for absorbing positive knowledge.

    Knowledge of what is does not open the door directly to what should be.

    The most beautiful emotion we can experience is the mysterious. It is the power of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead. To know that what is impenetrable to us really exists, manifesting itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, which our dull faculties can comprehend only in their most primitive forms -- this knowledge, this feeling, is at the center of true religiousness. In this sense, and in this sense only, I belong to the rank of devoutly religious men.

    There comes a time when the mind takes a higher plane of knowledge but can never prove how it got there.

    During the last century, and part of the one before, it was widely held that there was an unreconcilable conflict between knowledge and belief.


    Knowledge is limited but imagination encircles the world

    One should guard against preaching to young people success in the customary form as the main aim in life. The most important motive forwork in school and in life is pleasure in work, pleasure in its result, and the knowledge of the value of the result to the community.

    Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge of Truth and Knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the gods.

    The insight into the mystery of life, coupled though it be with fear, has also given rise to religion. To know what is impenetrable to us really exists, manifesting itself as the highest wisdom and the most radiant beauty, which our dull faculties can comprehend only in their most primitive forms this knowledge, this feeling is at the center of true religiousness.

    I believe in the brotherhood of man and the uniqueness of the individual. But if you ask me to prove what I believe, I can't. You know them to be true but you could spend a whole lifetime without being able to prove them. The mind can proceed only so far upon what it knows and can prove. There comes a point where the mind takes a higher plane of knowledge, but can never prove how it got there. All great discoveries have involved such a leap.


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