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Famous Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche Quotes

Listed in: Inspirational Quotes

On Love:

Love is more afraid of change than destruction.

On Life:

As regards the celebrated ”struggle for life,” it seems to me for the present to have been rather asserted than proved. It does occur, but as the exception the general aspect of life is not hunger and distress, but rather wealth, luxury, even absurd prodigality — where there is a struggle it is a struggle for power.

He that prefers the beautiful to the useful in life will, undoubtedly, like children who prefer sweetmeats to bread, destroy his digestion and acquire a very fretful outlook on the world.

No, life has not disappointed me. On the contrary, I find it truer, more desirable and mysterious every year — ever since the day when the great liberator came to me the idea that life could be an experiment of the seeker for knowledge — and not a duty, not a calamity, not trickery.

The secret of reaping the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment from life is to liver dangerously.

On Death:

The certain prospect of death could sweeten every life with a precious and fragrant drop of levity – and now you strange apothecary souls have turned it into an ill-tasting drop of poison that makes the whole of life repulsive

On Happiness:

Much more happiness is to be found in the world than gloomy eyes discover.

On God:

God is a gross answer, an indelicacy against us thinkers — at bottom, merely a gross prohibition for us you shall not think.

Your god is dead and only the ignorant weep. And if you claim there is a hell, then we shall meet there

On Religion:

But in the end one also has to understand that the needs that religion has satisfied and philosophy is now supposed to satisfy are not immutable they can be weakened and exterminated. Consider, for example, that Christian distress of mind that comes from sighing over ones inner depravity and care for ones salvation — all concepts originating in nothing but errors of reason and deserving, not satisfaction, but obliteration.

On Christianity:

When one gives up the Christian faith, one pulls the right to Christian morality out from under one’s feet. This morality is by no means self-evident. Christianity is a system, a whole view of things thought out together. By breaking one main concept out of it, the faith in God, one breaks the whole. It stands or falls with faith in God.