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Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” Quotes (77 Quotes)


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  • The fallen angel becomes a malignant devil. Yet even that enemy of God and man had friends and associates in his desolation; I am alone.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • When happy, inanimate nature had the power of bestowing on me the most delightful sensations.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • I also became a poet, and for one year lived in a Paradise of my own creation; I imagined that I also might obtain a niche in the temple where the names of Homer and Shakespeare are consecrated.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • I wished sometimes to shake off all thought and feeling, but I learned that there was but one means to overcome the sensation of pain, and that was death - a state which I feared yet did not understand.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • My spirit will sleep in peace; or if it thinks, it will not surely think thus. Farewell.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")


  • The labours of men of genius, however erroneously directed, scarcely ever fail in ultimately turning to the solid advantage of mankind.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Do I not deserve an acomplish of some great purpose? ... I prefer glory to every enticement than wealth placed in my path.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Even broken in spirit as he is, no one can feel more deeply than he does the beauties of nature. The starry sky, the sea, and every sight afforded by these wonderful regions, seems still to have the power of elevating his soul from earth. Such a man has a double existence: he may suffer misery, and be overwhelmed by disappointments; yet, when he has retired into himself, he will be like a celestial spirit that has a halo around him, within whose circle no grief or folly ventures.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Even where the affections are not strongly moved by any superior excellence, the companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain. They know our infantine dispositions, which, however they may be afterwards modified, are never eradicated; and they can judge of our actions with more certain conclusions as to the integrity of our motives.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • A mind of moderate capacity which closely pursues one study must infallibly arrive at great proficiency in that study.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • A miserable spectacle of wrecked humanity, pitiable to others and intolerable to myself.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust?
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • But he found that a traveller's life is one that includes much pain amidst its enjoyments. His feelings are for ever on the stretch; and when he begins to sink into repose, he finds himself obliged to quit that on which he rests in pleasure for something new, which again engages his attention, and which also he forsakes for other novelties.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")

  • But soon, I shall die, and what I now feel be no longer felt. Soon these burning miseries will be extinct.
    (Mary Shelley, "Frankenstein")


    More Mary Shelley Quotations (Based on Topics)


    Man - Emotions - Life - Sadness - World - Mind - Nature - Friendship - Power - Soul - Education - Wisdom & Knowledge - Happiness - Secrets - Time - Imagination & Visualization - Light - Curiosity - Present - Enemy - View All Mary Shelley Quotations

    More Mary Shelley Quotations (By Book Titles)


    - Frankenstein

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