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Elizabeth Gaskell’s “North and South” Quotes (30 Quotes)


  • It had been a royal time of luxury to him, with all its stings and contumelies, compared to the poverty that crept round and clipped the anticipation of the future down to sordid fact, and life without an atmosphere of either hope or fear.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • The question always is, has everything been done to make the sufferings of these exceptions as small as possible? Or, in the triumph of the crowded procession, have the helpless been trampled on, instead of being gently lifted aside out of the roadway of the conqueror, whom they have no power to accompany on his march?
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • But Margaret was at an age when any apprehension, not absolutely based on a knowledge of facts, is easily banished for a time by a bright sunny day, or some happy outward circumstance. And when the brilliant fourteen fine days of October came on, her cares were all blown away as lightly as thistledown, and she thought of nothing but the glories of the forest.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • It is bad to believe you in error. It would be infinitely worse to have known you a hypocrite.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • They had grown up together from childhood, and all along Edith had been remarked upon by every one, except Margaret, for her prettiness;
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")


  • But Margaret went less abroad, among machinery and men; saw less of power in its public effect, and, as it happened, she was thrown with one or two of those who, in all measures affecting masses of people, must be acute sufferers for the good of many. The question always is, has everything been done to make the sufferings of these exceptions as small as possible?
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • It was one of Mrs. Hale's fitful days, when everything was a difficulty and a hardship; and Mr Lennox's appearance took this shape, although secretly she felt complimented by his thinking it worthwhile to call.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • We do not look for reason for logic in the passionate entreaties of those who are sick unto death; we are stung with the recollection of a thousand slighted opportunities of fulfilling the wishes of those who will soon pass away from among us: and do they ask us for the future happiness of our lives, we lay it at their feet, and will it away from us.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • But the monotonous life led by invalids often makes them like children, inasmuch as thy have neither of them any sense of proportion in events, and seem each to believe that the walls and curtains which shut in their world, and shut out everything else, must of necessity be larger than anything hidden beyond.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • Margaret found that the indifferent, careless conversations of one who, however kind, was not too warm and anxious a sympathizer, did her good.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • Yet is was very difficult to seperate her interpretation, and keep it distinct from his meaning.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • But the trees were gorgeous in their autumnal leafiness - the warm odours of flowers and herb came sweet upon the sense.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • Margaret the Churchwoman, her father the Dissenter, Higgins the Infidel, knelt down together. It did them no harm.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • Yet within a miles, Margaret knew of house after house, where she would for her own sake, and her mother for her Aunt Shaw's, would be welcomed, if they came to gladness, or even in peace of mind. If they came sorrowing, and wanting sympathy in a complicated trouble like the present, then they would be felt as a shadow in all these houses of intimate acquaintances.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • But with the increase of serious and just ground of complaint, a new kind of patience had sprung up in her Mother's mind. She was gentle and quiet in intense bodily suffering, almost in proportion as she had been restless and depressed when there had been no real cause for grief.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")


    More Elizabeth Gaskell Quotations (Based on Topics)


    Man - Suffering - Mind - Sense & Perception - Time - Woman - People - Grief - World - Present - Childhood - Future - Wisdom & Knowledge - Courage - Facts - Angels - War & Peace - Complaints - Desire - Error & Mistake - View All Elizabeth Gaskell Quotations

    More Elizabeth Gaskell Quotations (By Book Titles)


    - North and South

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