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Elizabeth Gaskell’s “North and South” Quotes (30 Quotes)


  • But Margaret was at an age when any apprehension, not absolutely based on a knowledge of facts, is easily banished for a time by a bright sunny day, or some happy outward circumstance. And when the brilliant fourteen fine days of October came on, her cares were all blown away as lightly as thistledown, and she thought of nothing but the glories of the forest.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • But Margaret went less abroad, among machinery and men; saw less of power in its public effect, and, as it happened, she was thrown with one or two of those who, in all measures affecting masses of people, must be acute sufferers for the good of many. The question always is, has everything been done to make the sufferings of these exceptions as small as possible?
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • But the monotonous life led by invalids often makes them like children, inasmuch as thy have neither of them any sense of proportion in events, and seem each to believe that the walls and curtains which shut in their world, and shut out everything else, must of necessity be larger than anything hidden beyond.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • But the trees were gorgeous in their autumnal leafiness - the warm odours of flowers and herb came sweet upon the sense.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • But with the increase of serious and just ground of complaint, a new kind of patience had sprung up in her Mother's mind. She was gentle and quiet in intense bodily suffering, almost in proportion as she had been restless and depressed when there had been no real cause for grief.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")


  • Come poor little heart! be cheery and brave. We'll be a great deal to one another, if we are thrown off and left desolate.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • God has made us so that we must be mutually dependent. We may ignore our own dependence, or refuse to acknowledge that others depend upon us in more respects than the payment of weekly wages; but the thing must be, nevertheless. Neither you nor any other master can help yourselves. The most proudly independent man depends on those around him for their insensible influence on his character - his life.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • He loved her, and would love her; and defy her, and this miserable bodily pain.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • How different men were to women!
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • I believe that this suffering, which Miss Hale says is impressed on the countenances of the people of Milton, is but the natural punishment of dishonestly-enjoyed pleasure, at some former period of their lives. I do not look on self-indulgent, sensual people as worthy of my hatred; I simply look upon them with contempt for their poorness of character.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • I have passed out of childhood into old age. I have had no youth - no womanhood; the hopes of womanhood have closed for me - for I shall never marry; and I anticipate cares and sorrows just as if I were an old woman, and with the same fearful spirit.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • If they came sorrowing, and wanting sympathy in a complicated trouble like the present, then they would be felt as a shadow in all these houses of intimate acquaintances, not friends
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • It had been a royal time of luxury to him, with all its stings and contumelies, compared to the poverty that crept round and clipped the anticipation of the future down to sordid fact, and life without an atmosphere of either hope or fear.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • It is bad to believe you in error. It would be infinitely worse to have known you a hypocrite.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")

  • It was one of Mrs. Hale's fitful days, when everything was a difficulty and a hardship; and Mr Lennox's appearance took this shape, although secretly she felt complimented by his thinking it worthwhile to call.
    (Elizabeth Gaskell, "North and South")


    More Elizabeth Gaskell Quotations (Based on Topics)


    Man - Mind - Suffering - People - Time - Woman - Sense & Perception - Present - World - Childhood - Future - Wisdom & Knowledge - Courage - Facts - Grief - Life - Money & Wealth - Opportunity - Performance - Self-control - View All Elizabeth Gaskell Quotations

    More Elizabeth Gaskell Quotations (By Book Titles)


    - North and South

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