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Aristotle Quotes (367 Quotes)


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  • Politicians also have no leisure, because they are always aiming at something beyond political life itself, power and glory, or happiness.
    (Aristotle)

  • A tragedy is the imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself ... with incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions.
    (Aristotle)

  • Actions determine what kind of characteristics are developed.
    (Aristotle)

  • for the lesser evil is reckoned a good in comparison with the greater evil, since the lesser evil is rather to be chosen than the greater
    (Aristotle)

  • What is justice To give every man his own.
    (Aristotle)


  • There was never a genius without a tincture of madness.
    (Aristotle)

  • Happiness is activity.
    (Aristotle)

  • The best political community is formed by citizens of the middle class.
    (Aristotle)

  • The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.
    (Aristotle)

  • No one loves the man whom he fears.
    (Aristotle)

  • In practical matters the end is not mere speculative knowledge of what is to be done, but rather the doing of it. It is not enough to know about Virtue, then, but we must endeavor to possess it, and to use it, or to take any other steps that may make
    (Aristotle)

  • A nose which varies from the ideal of straightness to a hook or snub may still be of good shape and agreeable to the eye.
    (Aristotle)

  • Nor was civil society founded merely to preserve the lives of its members but that they might live well for otherwise a state might be composed of slaves, or the animal creation... nor is it an alliance mutually to defend each other from injuries, or for a commercial intercourse. But whosoever endeavors to establish wholesome laws in a state, attends to the virtues and vices of each individual who composes it from whence it is evident, that the first care of him who would found a city, truly deserving that name, and not nominally so, must be to have his citizens virtuous.
    (Aristotle)

  • The ideal man bears the accidents of life with dignity and grace, making the best of circumstances.
    (Aristotle)

  • The moral virtues, then, are produced in us neither by nature nor against nature. Nature, indeed, prepares in us the ground for their reception, but their complete formation is the product of habit.
    (Aristotle)


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